Jump to content


Photo

[Advice & Suggestions Needed] I'm Going to Japan!

Japan travel holiday

  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 ShiroiChanUK

ShiroiChanUK

    My girlfriend just dumped me. -_-

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,353 posts

Posted 21 August 2013 - 03:22 AM

Recently some of my friends invited me on a trip to Japan in 2015 but I speak very little Japanese and wanted to know what is the best dialect to learn? Posted Image We will be travelling all over Japan for 3+ weeks and 2 years isn't enough time to learn lots of dialects. Some of my friends can speak Japanese on a conversational level and I want to make the effort too Posted Image

Also does anyone have any recommendations of what to do while I'm there? I'm going in a pretty big group and we're trying to pick at least one thing to do each Posted Image We've already planned to visit Akihabara for most of our shopping, Osaka but I don't know what we're doing there yet and we'll be going to the hot springs in Kinosaki Posted Image


P.S. What's the best way to get my body used to extremely hot temperatures? I'm Albino therefore I'm more likely to suffer from heat related conditions than most people but I really want to go in the hot springs with everyone Posted Image

Any advice and suggestions are appreciated, thank you Posted Image

--------------------

I'm so excited about this trip and my Mum has very kindly promised to match whatever I save from now until 2015 Posted Image


#2 a_chan

a_chan

    I can't get BoA off my mind!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 915 posts

Posted 22 August 2013 - 12:33 AM

I would say don't bother learning any dialects. If you just learn standard Japanese then everyone will understand what you're saying wherever you are. Besides there aren't very many resources to teach you dialects anyway.

My advice is to make sure to practice plain form and learn basic Japanese etiquette, particularly when it comes to shopping, eating out and greetings.

#3 ItsKwonBoa

ItsKwonBoa

    mmm... BoA's cute

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 06:38 AM

Oh... it will be good if you use long sleeves but with the soft / light/ not thick clothes so that it'll be cooler at least. You can learn any dialects, it's fine and it'll be good. You should visit Mount Fuji of course and some relaxing places and also museums, there are a lot of them!

#4 AtM

AtM

    Who's BoA?

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 02 October 2013 - 08:29 PM

Recently some of my friends invited me on a trip to Japan in 2015 but I speak very little Japanese and wanted to know what is the best dialect to learn? Posted Image We will be travelling all over Japan for 3+ weeks and 2 years isn't enough time to learn lots of dialects. Some of my friends can speak Japanese on a conversational level and I want to make the effort too Posted Image

Also does anyone have any recommendations of what to do while I'm there? I'm going in a pretty big group and we're trying to pick at least one thing to do each Posted Image We've already planned to visit Akihabara for most of our shopping, Osaka but I don't know what we're doing there yet and we'll be going to the hot springs in Kinosaki Posted Image


P.S. What's the best way to get my body used to extremely hot temperatures? I'm Albino therefore I'm more likely to suffer from heat related conditions than most people but I really want to go in the hot springs with everyone Posted Image

Any advice and suggestions are appreciated, thank you Posted Image

--------------------

I'm so excited about this trip and my Mum has very kindly promised to match whatever I save from now until 2015 Posted Image


That's great to hear that you are going to japan :thumbsup: If you are interested in Japan, the culture, music, food, movies, or whatever, you will be able to find something that will interest you. I was fortunate enough to have an ex who entered the JET Program, and she lived in Chiba and Nagoya for four years, so I was over there quite a bit. I still manage to make it over at least once a year, as I have a lot of friends in Tokyo and Kyoto, and my current girlfriend is from Tokyo originally. I went over the first time not knowing a word of Japanese, and I traveled for a month by myself from Sapporo to Fukuoka. There were a few times when I struggled, mostly in the smaller places, but In Tokyo, Osaka, and Kyoto, there are quite a few signs in English, many of the restaurants have English menus available, or at least big ass pictures you can point at, or models of the food. In the smaller towns, there is little to no English spoken or to be seen, but if you have a decent English/Japanese dictionary, you will be able to get around. Even the big travel books like Fordor's, Lonely Planet and Frommers, have a fairly decent section of useful phrases, words, and katakana that you will find useful. I wouldn't worry about dialect, as long as you learn some Japanese, you will be fine. Find a copy of Rosetta Stone V.4, and you will be on your way.
Osaka has a fairly big area (Den-Den Town) which is similar to Akihabara in Tokyo too. I bought more electronics there than in Akihabara, as the prices were a bit less, but Akihabara has a lot more atmosphere and things to do. If I had to choose places i wouold go visit, other than Tokyo, because I love that city, I would say you really should go to Kyoto, as the shrines and temples are amazing. You'll be in Osaka, so Kyoto is only a short 35 minutes and $6.50 train ride away. I also highly recommend Nikko, as there are quite a few World Heritage shrines and temples in the park.The bus ride up the side of the mountain to the Lake Chuzenji is worth the price by itself, as it is nasty tight, and exciting. The ryokans in the National park are top-notch, and most of them have onsens, both indoor and outdoor. I can not offer you any tips for getting used to the heat of the onsen, other than start taking hot baths to buiold tolerance. Most of them have small single person tubs, which are usually not as hot as the main baths. I see people soaking in them first, to adjust their bodies to the heat, so when they go into the main pool/bath, they can tolerate the heat better/quicker. I could go on forever about things to do over there, and if you have any questions, pm me, as it might be easier.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Japan, travel, holiday

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users